Waste Not Want Not. Right?

I came across this blog and her ideas about accepting personal responsibility for our food consumption AND WASTE is compelling. I have heard the stat that she quoted before: that 50% of food produced in US ends up as waste (!!). Extraordinary!  And truly shameful.

I know I am guilty of not planning meals out properly and allowing veges to mould in the back of the fridge before I use them. I have over ordered at restaurants, maybe even taken the leftovers home but left them on the counter instead of refrigerating them, thereby allowing them to spoil. My kids pour too much cereal into their bowls and don’t finish it. In my weaker moments I allow them too many afternoon snacks which ruins their appetites for dinner.  My sorry list of wasteful confessions could go on and on.

I think being more mindful and aware of how much we really do waste is a good step in a sustainable direction.  But it takes commitment, right?  Being mindful is one thing but following through with action is what really matters.  And firing up the compost heap! I do feel like the spoiled cucumbers aren’t a complete loss of they go back into the garden at some point … right?

Hmm, this post has got me thinking.  What do you do to minimize food waste at your house?

Small Town Soul, Big City Brain

Ever since I watched Dive! (http://www.divethefilm.com/) a few years ago, I have been ultra-concerned with the amount of food we waste. I learned that about 50% of all the food produced in the U.S. ends up in the dump. When students approach me about writing on GMOs “because they are going to save the world,” I’m the (annoying) teacher who challenges their thinking by forcing them to consider the amount of food we waste as a potential solution to the food crisis. My request is logical: Do not overstate the impact of any one solution on world hunger. I must admit that my ulterior motive is to save myself from reading another paper on the GMO debate, primarily because the issue is a confusing mess from which no one has derived a clear definition that distinguishes genetically modified from hybridized organisms. After all, humans have been hybridizing crops since agriculture began. Only one of my students has addressed how…

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2 thoughts on “Waste Not Want Not. Right?

  1. Thank you for supporting my blog. Sharing this journey with others is fueling my sustainable circular attitude! Action is key, and composting has got to become part of my sustainable repertoire. I’m glad the weekend is here, giving me time to read more of your blog…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I have to say, I’m a big fan of composting! And when I don’t get it right and the leftovers can’t be used there is *some* benefit to asuage my guilt. I use a tumbler which I find much easier than the old school bins that need turning. Maybe something to consider. I promise you, you will love it and so will your garden! Thanks for your comment 🙂

    Like

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